The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society - Fighting Blood Cancers
14 Replies Latest reply: May 10, 2012 10:04 PM by felursus RSS

What to bring to transplant?

Sunshine48 Registered Users
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There might have already been a post about this but what would ya'll recommend to bring with my to the hospital, besides clothes lol. I am being admitted soon and trying to pack, Any suggestions would be awesome : ) thank you!

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    lymphomajourney Registered Users
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    You might find my post on preparing for a long hospital stay of interest - based upon my transplant experience. Link here.

     

    Best of luck,

    Andrew

    Lymphoma Journey

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    Tex Registered Users
    Currently Being Moderated

    You really aren't going to need street clothes.  I'd only bring one set and hope it gets used ASAP (going home).

     

    What do you like to do to keep yourself amused?  I had some computer games and my wife taped the Comedy Channel every night so I could see my Daily show because hospital TV really sux.  (The VHS was provided...maybe they're all DVD players today?)

     

    Talk to your dentist about what will keep your teeth and gums healthy.  I had an Oral-B toothbrush and a little kind of z-shaped utensil to work my gums gently and keep food particles from between my teeth.  When I became thrombocytopenic floss was too sharp and made my gums bleed.  I don't know if I was just lucky or what but I had absolutely no problems with my gums throughout my SCT.

     

    A cheap phone answering machine was really nice.  When I went for a walk (when it seems I got most of my calls) and I heard the phone ringing as I was getting back to my room, I didn't feel a need to rush.  That was really nice.  Afterward, I donated it to the floor (it was like $15).

     

    Basically, comfortable clothes like sweats, shorts, t-shirts...or a three-piece suit with a bow tie if you're comfortable in that.  Just be sure you are comfortable.  That's the most important thing.

     

    Other than that, you're going to have a lot of time on your back and/or butt.  A lot of that time you're not going to care about anything but for those moments you do, make sure you're entertained.  If time moves slower in prison, I'd be surprised.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Blessings

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    KyGuy Registered Users
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    Sunshine48 wrote:

     

    besides clothes lol.

    A lot of hospitals frown on patients showing up naked (except newborns).  I have no personal experience with that - I've just heard stories.  I did wear my own clothes.  I had a hickman line so it was easy to change my clothes.  The hospital encouraged me to wear my own clothes since it would make me feel more like a real person (my words, not theirs).

     

    I couldn't have made it without my PC.  Some hospitals have god-awful slow internet speeds so plan to have some dvd's to watch just in case.  Take your own personal items to be more comfortable - including decent toilet paper.  If your own pillow would make you more comfortable, bring it.

     

    Take care,

    Kelly

    • Re: What to bring to transplant?
      Tex Registered Users
      Currently Being Moderated

      KyGuy wrote:

       

      A lot of hospitals frown on patients showing up naked (except newborns).

       

      Oooooh, that explains all of the hullabaloo at the emergency room my freshman year.

       

      You know, I never thought about the TP...that would've been a great idea.  I did bring my pillow but you need to make sure Housekeeping doesn't accidentally recycle it.

       

      Blessings

      • Re: What to bring to transplant?
        KyGuy Registered Users
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        Tex wrote:

         

        KyGuy wrote:

         

        A lot of hospitals frown on patients showing up naked (except newborns).

         

        Oooooh, that explains all of the hullabaloo at the emergency room my freshman year.

        If by hullabaloo you mean laughter, then you're right.

        • Re: What to bring to transplant?
          Tex Registered Users
          Currently Being Moderated

          KyGuy wrote:

           

          Tex wrote:

           

          KyGuy wrote:

           

          A lot of hospitals frown on patients showing up naked (except newborns).

           

          Oooooh, that explains all of the hullabaloo at the emergency room my freshman year.

          If by hullabaloo you mean laughter, then you're right.

           

          Well, it was nervous laughter.  They had never encountered such magnificence and weren't sure how to respond to it.

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    Registered Users
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    Are you referring to a blood transfusion or a bone marrow transplant? Wasn't sure which one you meant...these are all great pieces of advice, regardless. Make sure to have people lined up for your after care, though! You will probably be pretty immobile and out of it, so get people you care about to cook you food, drive you around, hold your hand, etc If your'e interested in side effects of the transplant, here's a good link with an answer from a real doctor! http://bit.ly/JQCrzH

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    RMD Registered Users
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    Speaking of clothes: I liked slip-on type slippers with good traction on them.

     

    Slip-ons worked better for me because I didn't have to bend over (I was light-headed at times plus I didn't like having my hands down near the hospital floor to tie laces or pull on socks- germy!)

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    felursus Registered Users
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    Well, I haven't had a transplant (at least not yet), but I HAVE been "incarcerated", as Tex would say, for a month.  I think the TP is a great idea - the hospital stuff is rough.  I also brought baby wipes (I'm allergic to the "adult" kind), because any, ah "alterations" in your bowels can lead to irritation.  I changed into day clothes every day (except for a couple of days when I felt too lousy), and as I'm a PT, I put on scrubs, because they are so comfortable.  I suggest loose, comfortable clothing. For my next "adventure in hospital living", I've acquired some lightweight sweats - courtesy of Costco (Jockey also makes some nice, lightweight knit pants that could also be worn as pj bottoms with a t-shirt.). I found the a/c got to me - so you have to be prepared. The hospital gave me a ton of those non-skid socks, but I had a pair of Crocs, and even when my feet swelled (from all the fluids they pumped into me), the Crocs still fit even with the socks on.  I actually do recommend them to patients, because they are non-skid, slip on, and stay securely on the feet.  I brought a soft, cervical roll pillow (which I use all the time at home, and it's different enough from hospital stuff not to confuse the staff).  I found I was always cold at night, so I had a fleece pj top (it was summer, and the a/c in the room was hard to control) that I wore as a bed jacket at night.  I also brought a fleece blanket.  For teeth I used one of those battery-operated ones with soft bristles so it wouldn't irritate my teeth.  (I'm used to using a rechargeable one at home.) 

     

    I brought a speaker for my iPhone.   As I wasn't as immuno-compromised (well, certainly for not as long) as you will be, I was allowed out of my room for walks, so I also had Bose headphones - that way I could "be in my own world" and concentrate on walking my "laps".  For entertainment, I had a couple of easy-reading books: I found it difficult to concentrate a lot of the time, a TV, and my computer. The wifi was good where I was, so I could access lots of online stuff.  I'm not a huge movie fan, but if you are DVDs are a good idea.

     

    Ask if they have a bulletin board in the room: bring family/friend photos and put them up.  If there's no board, then a couple of framed, stand-up photos of your nearest and dearest might be nice.  One of the nicest things someone gave me was a little balsam pillow: I enjoyed sniffing it so I could pretend I was in a pine wood.  Besides, that, anythihg you are particularly fond of that will make you feel better. 

     

    All the best - and hugs,

    Karen

    • Re: What to bring to transplant?
      KyGuy Registered Users
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      The pictures are a great idea.  I had a bulletin board in Seattle.  My wife put a poster board of pictures together for our local hospital so do that if a bulletin board is not available.  I also created a screen saver of family pics for my time in Seattle.

       

      Take care,

      Kelly

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    warrior Registered Users
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    The chemo (and or radiation) for the transplant is intense, leaving my partner without much concentration BUT prior to her admission we made a 3 hour slide show of pictures I had gathered from all our friends.( we have friends who go to exotic places for vacation) She had an ipad which I highly recommend for the hospital it is SO much easier than a computer to navigate in and out of bed. Depending on the hospital I recommend a mobile hot spot. so you can down load movies from netflicks the wifi at her hospital blocked movies and tv shows ....head phones and a mobile music source....i also had our friends send dvds of funny movies and tv shows which we watched a bit of each night. DO NOT think you will get much accomplished energy and concentration are pretty low....may you have a boring transplant

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    Lottie Registered Users
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    Hi Sunshine,

    My husband had his SCT in March 2011. He brought a lot of pairs of PJs and underpants. You know, sweats, comfy shorts, and tons of lightweight tee shirts. Stuff you're comfy in when laying in bed. He brought enough for 7 days, and I would do laundry for him on the weekends. He also brought a pair of sandals. His transplant hospital (Mass General) said that any shoes he wanted to wear had to be "plastic" so that the nurses could spray and wipe them down every day. No fuzzy slippers were allowed. Your hospital might allow slippers though, so if they do, go for it!

    For fun, we brought Nate's play station and a ton of games. He was also able to watch movies on it. To be honest he didnt use it all that much because he wasnt feeling well, but it was nice to kill the time once he felt better and was just killing time until his counts rose enough to come home. Nate also had me get him a remote control helicopter which he enjoyed quite a bit. He was terrible at it. I spent hours retrieving it for him from under the bed or under the treadmill or stuck in the curtains (he wasnt allowed to touch anything from the floor). Eventually it got lodged way too far behind the treadmill and I said I couldnt get to it, and that was the end of that . Nate isn't much of a reader, but I brought him some car magazines which he did look through. Oh, and food. He had a mini fridge and freezer in his room, and a microwave just outside for me or the nurses to heat up food for him. The hospital food got boring. He had popsicles, frozen dinners, mountain dew, gatorade, bagel bites, and chef boyardee ravioli. The ravioli and bagel bites were his favorites for some reason...and hot pockets (gross). However disgusting I find them, the medical team was just happy to see him eating. So if you can, bring in soft foods that you like to eat for when you dont want anything from the menu any more.

    Wishing you the best of luck Sunshine!

  • Re: What to bring to transplant?
    jacksonsnana Registered Users
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    I had my transplant in the month of June. It was in the 90's outside so everyone staying with me wanted the air conditioner on. Me..I wanted the heat on. I was freezing ALL the time. So as to not give my caregiver and nurses a heat stroke I used an electric blanket.

     

    Also had a small electric heater that I could use to really heat up the bathroom right before my shower. If I didn't I would shiver uncontrollably for quite awhile after getting out of the shower.

    Hope this helps!

     

    Many Blessings

    Sherry

    • Re: What to bring to transplant?
      felursus Registered Users
      Currently Being Moderated

      Good point, Sherry.  I remember a patient I had (not at Sloan Kettering) in a hospital where the patients had a/c in the rooms, but there was no a/c in the hall.  My patient was very ill and extremely thin - to the point of near-transparency. It was in the 90s outside, but as the patient was always cold, he didn't have the a/c on in the room, and he lay under 3-4 blanket!  It had to be well over 100 degrees in the room, so I couldn't bear to be in it, as it made me feel faint.  I could only manage it long enough to take him out of bed and seat him in the chair.  Then I would go and stand in the doorway - where, despite the lack of a/c, there was a breeze (and the temperature was probably at least 10 degrees cooler than the room) - and demonstrate the exercises I wanted the patient to do.   As I said in my response - I had a fleece blanket from home and a fleece pj jacket that I wore as a bed jacket.

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